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Baden-Württemberg and its researchers

The universities, universities of applied sciences and research institutions in Baden-Württemberg cover the full range of research topics and subjects that are essential for the bioeconomy, including in particular the agricultural sciences, forestry, soil science, plastics technology, materials science, textile engineering, food technology, energy, food technology, economics, chemistry, biology, biotechnology, ecology and ethics.

The Baden-Württemberg Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts established a bioeconomy strategy group in 2012. The strategy group consisted of experts from universities, universities of applied sciences and non-university research institutions who analysed the situation in Baden-Württemberg against the context of the bioeconomy.

They analysed the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of a broad range of bioeconomy-related aspects. At the end of the process, the strategy group suggested three research areas in which research projects could be carried out to push forward the transition from a fossil fuel-based to a biobased economy in Baden-Württemberg in the medium and long term.

In 2013, the Baden-Württemberg Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts adopted the "Baden-Württemberg Bioeconomy Research Programme" which aims to implement the research strategy developed by the strategy group. The ministry will provide funding for relevant research projects as well as structural measures. The programme runs for five years and is financed by the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts. Major focus will be placed on the following three themes: biogas, lignocellulose and microalgae.

 

Current research topics

  • Lentil cultivation and cleaning on the farm - EIP-AGRI Rhizo-Linse project - 16/03/2022

    Lentils are among the oldest crop plants in Central European agriculture and were once a popular food in ancient Egypt, Persia and Mesopotamia. The legume was widespread in Germany until the mid-20th century, but has since disappeared completely from farmers’ fields. Over the past decade, lentils have reappeared as a crop grown locally and are cultivated in harmony with nature.

  • Alternative foodstuff ? - 09/03/2022

    If there were a competition for the ‘crop of the future’, hemp would certainly be at the top. But not because of the intoxicating effect of some hemp varieties. Cannabis has the potential to help supply protein in the quantities required by a growing world population – in a sustainable way. The TASTINO project brings together researchers from academia and industry to work on ways to make the regional superfood available as a vegan alternative.

Researcher profiles

  • Lentil cultivation and cleaning on the farm - EIP-AGRI Rhizo-Linse project - 16/03/2022

    Lentils are among the oldest crop plants in Central European agriculture and were once a popular food in ancient Egypt, Persia and Mesopotamia. The legume was widespread in Germany until the mid-20th century, but has since disappeared completely from farmers’ fields. Over the past decade, lentils have reappeared as a crop grown locally and are cultivated in harmony with nature.

  • Alternative foodstuff ? - 09/03/2022

    If there were a competition for the ‘crop of the future’, hemp would certainly be at the top. But not because of the intoxicating effect of some hemp varieties. Cannabis has the potential to help supply protein in the quantities required by a growing world population – in a sustainable way. The TASTINO project brings together researchers from academia and industry to work on ways to make the regional superfood available as a vegan alternative.

BIOPRO Magazin

Ausgabe 1 / 2015
Ausgabe 1 / 2015
Priority topic

Biobased plastics

The new priority topic "Biobased plastics" clearly shows where bioplastics are already found in our daily lives. The BIOPRO Magazin is free of charge and can be ordered online from BIOPRO Baden-Württemberg.

Website address: https://www.biooekonomie-bw.de/en/bw/stakeholders/researcher